Wild Ferns – Fiction

Time for another installment of   Friday Fictioneers  hosted by Rochelle.  100 words or so based on the image below. Click on the froggy link (after this piece) and come join us!

This piece continues a story I wrote yesterday.  That story can be found here  – take a peek if you have time – but…I think this one can also stand alone.

keckWild Ferns

After meeting online and exchanging surface information about our poetry, we’d decided to meet at the Millbrae Train Station.

He’s handsome,  in a rugged hiker’s sense.  His beard is short and gray like his hair.  His eyes are bright blue and pierce right through a soul.

We walked around downtown Millbrae and had sandwiches  at Pickles.  It was there that I asked him about his work.  He lost me  after the words ‘optical telescopes’.  Something he said made me think of wild ferns growing in the swamps back home.  One day, I’ll ask him about that.

After supper, we walked to a cafe.  Poets were reading.

Ellespeth

photo prompt © Douglas M. MacIlroy

34 thoughts on “Wild Ferns – Fiction

  1. The words “optical telescopes” – or anything remotely similar, would be enough to make my eyes glaze over, too, Ellespeth. Stick to the poetry, I’d say. This is a lovely, romantic little story, gently paced and with some very nice descriptions. 🙂

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  2. This is a delightful love story. I just love the relaxed pace and how the two of them are travelling along on their own tracks, but staying together. The last line is wonderful.

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    • I see something in these last two pieces. It’s all still forming a life in my imagination. It’s nice for tracks to merge now and then – keeps life interesting…as they’ve discovered. The ending part was difficult. I’m glad you liked it.

      Thanks for reading and continuing to support my work, Margaret.

      Ellespeth

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  3. Dear Ellespeth, You are so good with these short stories – and you are so entertaining! Love your words and logic. My husband is an Electrical Engineer and when we first started dating, my eyes would glaze over at the mention of technical language. But you know what, I learned (through osmosis) some technical stuff. I wouldn’t have it any other way. At times, it has come in handy! Nan

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    • This is such a special comment and critique of my work, Nan, and I’m very appreciative for it.

      I think scientists and engineers must get pretty used to that ‘glazed over look’. I’m with you, though, through the years it’s been quite an educational experience for me, to!

      I’m hoping to get reading a few more stories this evening. I never know where to start reading…so I tend to jump around a bit. I’ll look for yours.

      Ellespeth

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  4. Scientists need lessons in talking in a way that the public can understand and relate. It can be done, but the love for taking about work work often makes people’s eyes go empty when listening. Happened to me many a times when I tried to tell people what I was doing (although that was simple compared to astronomy). Great take on the prompt, if they like each other, they’ll find a way to communicate, hopefully. The poetry is a good start.

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    • I met my husband online. We were both in our 50’s. He’s a physicist. I’m a poet and – before I retired – I was also a secretary. The first time we ‘really’ met, we were walking and he said something about physics that made me think of photosynthesis. Nonetheless, I moved to Silicon Valley and we married and have been married 14 years.

      Thanks for reading this piece, gahlearner , and for continuing to support my work. I so appreciate your comments.

      Ellespeth

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    • Oh great! Glad you think this continuation is working. It was fun to expand the previous piece. Don’t often find a chance to do that. Based on personal experience, he probably does notice her distraction and he’s probably used to that…

      Thanks for reading and commenting, afm,

      Ellespeth

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    • This is fiction but…when we were courting, and I found out my husband to be was a physicist, I didn’t know how we were going to make that work. Somehow, we do 🙂

      Thanks for reading and commenting on this piece, Rochelle – especially with all that’s going on for you.

      Ellespeth

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    • I can see how poetry is like science – expanding ideas and the discipline required for both.

      Before we retired, my husband used to like to talk physics to me on the way to work in the morning! Oh man….

      Ellespeth

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    • My mind certainly wanders, that’s for sure…

      Crazy day! Hopefully I can settle down and start reading this week’s stories tomorrow afternoon. Enjoy your week-end.
      Ellespeth

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  5. As far as I know, these are telescopes. I think you’re right, Ellespeth. I think because they’re all lined up, they are one big telescope? That I don’t know. Great, out-of-the box story! I really enjoyed it.

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  6. Interesting story, Ellespeth, and it does stand on its own. I have to ask–what is the connection to the photo prompt? (This isn’t a criticism–many of us have stories that, on the surface, are only tenuously connected–but I enjoy hearing how others get to their stories.)

    All my best,
    MG

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